Union Cycliste Language Barriers in Education Impact Reflective Paper

writing as an educational historian and an educational advocate–which we’ll be doing for our major papers. So today we’re beginning with the “research” you’ve already done into public education: your own experiences in school. I’m asking you to write, then share what you wrote in small groups and then perhaps with the class. Here’s the prompt:

Reflect on your own education–in elementary, middle, or high school, or right here at UC Irvine–and identify a problem. What about your own education, or the education of others you know, caused difficulties or harm? Write for fifteen (15) minutes, covering two parts:

Part 1: Historical Analysis:

  • Identify the problem: What is it? What is its scope. Who’s affected?
  • What are its impacts on you and/or others. What harms did/does it cause?
  • Think about the causes of the problem: What factors led to it? When did it begin? How did it develop?

Part 2: Advocacy:

  • Discuss how the problem could be solved, or what attempts have already been made to solve the problem.
  • Who’s responsible for solving it? What must they do? What might it cost? Why are/aren’t these solutions likely to work?

Can’t think of a problem? Here are some ideas:

– Parental Involvement

– Administrators: principals, course directors, provosts, school boards, etc.

– Support staff (counselors, custodians, office managers, etc.)

– School closure or takeover

– Curriculum: In math, science, language, social sciences, arts, etc. (This could include recent shifts with Common Core.)

– Extracurriculars, including clubs and sports: lack of support for; over-emphasis on

– Academic programs: Special Ed, AVID, Summer Bridge, etc.

– Funding: tuition or expenses

– Class segregation or conflict (i.e. socioeconomic segregation, a.k.a. divides between the wealthy and the poor)–between schools, within schools and between classes or tracks, including access for low-income students

– Racial Segregation: see above -> between schools, between classes or tracks

– Students: preparation, motivation, workload, cheating, retention

– Tests: Too many, Too few. Tests on the wrong things or at the wrong times or in the wrong manner.

– Teachers: Preparation, Motivation, Retention

– Facilities: i.e. Environment and Equipment, including technology

– Language barriers: e.g. between teachers and students, between students